Adult Non Fiction

See the new stock from April here.


JULY

At the coal face – the memoir of a pit nurse by Joan Hart     At the coal face – the memoir of a pit nurse by Joan Hart

Joan Hart always knew what she wanted to do with her life. Born in South Yorkshire in 1932, she started her nursing training when she was 16, the youngest age girls could do so at the time. She continued working after she married and her work took her to London and Doncaster, caring for children and miners. When she took a job as a pit nurse in Doncaster in 1974, she found that in order to be accepted by the men under her care, she would have to become one of them. Most of the time rejecting a traditional nurse's uniform and donning a baggy miner's suit, pit boots, a hardhat and a headlamp, Joan resolved always to go down to injured miners and bring them out of the pit herself. Over 15 years Joan grew to know the miners not only as a nurse, but as a confidante and friend. She tended to injured miners underground, rescued men trapped in the pits, and provided support for them and their families during the bitter miners' strike which stretched from March 1984 to 1985.

The Raj at war – a people’s history of India’s Second World War by Yasmin Khan     The Raj at war – a people’s history of India’s Second World War by Yasmin Khan     

The Second World War was not fought by Britain alone. India produced the largest volunteer army in world history: 2.5 million men. But, until now, there has never been a comprehensive account of the developments on India's turbulent home front, and the nexus between warfare and India's society. At the heart of The Raj at War are the many lives and voices of ordinary Indian people. From the first Indian to win the Victoria Cross to the three soldiers imprisoned as 'traitors to the Raj' who returned to a hero's welcome, from the nurses in Indian General Hospitals, the labourers, prostitutes and families, their everyday testimonies reveal the great upheaval experienced throughout the land. Yasmin Khan presents the hidden and sometimes overlooked history of India at war, and shows how mobilisation for the war introduced seismic processes of economic, cultural and social change-decisively shaping both the international war effort, the unravelling of the empire and India's own political and economic trajectory.

The edge of the world – how the North Sea made us who we are by Michael Pye     The edge of the world – how the North Sea made us who we are by Michael Pye

Michael Pye's 'The Edge of the World' is an epic adventure: from the Vikings to the Enlightenment, from barbaric outpost to global centre, it tells the amazing story of northern Europe's transformation by sea.

The way we wore by Daphne Selfe     The way we wore by Daphne Selfe

Daphne Selfe has been photographed by Mario Testino, Nick Knight and David Bailey. She has modelled for Dolce and Gabbana, Red or Dead and high-street chains such as TK Maxx, and regularly appears in newspaper fashion pages and glossy magazines. She is one of Britain's most in-demand supermodels and has worked non-stop for almost twenty years. But what makes her really rather extraordinary is that she is now in her late eighties. Daphne grew up in an age when dresses were lovingly run up for you by your mother, when needlework for even the most basic outfit was an art form, and when a new Simplicity Pattern was almost more exciting than a new dance tune. Perhaps as a result, she has had a lifelong love affair with clothes and fashion. The Way We Wore is a heart-warming account of that love affair, taking readers from the organdie party frocks of a 1930s childhood to the pages of Vogue. In it, Daphne shares a wealth of anecdotes from her peripatetic childhood, following her teacher father from school to school, from her modelling career, which began as a department store house model, and from her long and happy marriage

Genghis Khan – the man who conquered the world by Frank McLynn     Genghis Khan – the man who conquered the world by Frank McLynn

Genghis Khan was by far the greatest conqueror the world has ever known, whose empire stretched from the Pacific Ocean to central Europe, including all of China, the Middle East and Russia. So how did an illiterate nomad rise to such colossal power, eclipsing Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar and Napoleon? Credited by some with paving the way for the Renaissance, condemned by others for being the most heinous murderer in history, who was Genghis Khan? His actual name was Temujin, and the story of his success is that of the Mongol people: a loose collection of fractious tribes who tended livestock, considered bathing taboo and possessed an unparalleled genius for horseback warfare. United under Genghis, a strategist of astonishing cunning and versatility, they could dominate any sedentary society they chose.

Explore Melbourne     Explore Melbourne

Whether you're looking for lively cafe culture, golden beaches or sporting action, you'll find it all in Melbourne. Insight Guide Explore Melbourne is part of the latest batch of this brand-new series and is the ideal pocket companion for your trip: a full-colour guide containing 14 easy-to-follow routes in and around the city. Discover Collins and Swanston Streets' fabulous architecture, the cultivated green space of the Royal Botanic Gardens and the fashionable seaside at St Kilda, or head off on an excursion, taking in the Yarra Valley's wineries or the stunning scenery of the Great Ocean Road.

 Brighton     Brighton

The Shortlist Brighton selects the very best of Brighton's sightseeing, restaurants, shopping, nightlife and entertainment, with Time Out's trademark expertise. It also takes you straight to the latest venues, tips you off to the news and fashions and gives the dates that matter.

Loire Valley     Loire Valley

The DK Eyewitness Travel Guide: Loire Valley will help you get the most out of your stay in this popular area of central France. The fully updated guide includes unique cutaways, floor plans and reconstructions of the must-see sites, plus street-by-street maps of all the fascinating cities and towns. The guide is also packed with photographs and illustrations leading you straight to the best attractions on offer.

JUNE

Naples and the Amalfi coastNaples and the Amalfi coast

Capture the essence of Naples and the Amalfi Coast with this guide. With listings of hotels and restaurants, and improved maps, it also provides practical information on where to go, what to take, how to get around, local specialities, main sight-seeing attractions and a complete area by area guide.

Getcha rocks off – sex and excess, bust-ups and binges, life and death on the rock ‘n’ roll road by Mick WallGetcha rocks off – sex and excess, bust-ups and binges, life and death on the rock ‘n’ roll road by Mick Wall

Hanging out with rock stars, trying to steal their chicks, or throwing up over their guitars after launching into the hospitality a little too enthusiastically, Mick Wall spent much of the 1980s sprawled in limos and five-star hotels with the biggest rock bands in the world, including Led Zeppelin, Guns N' Roses, Metallica, Black Sabbath, Motley Crue, Thin Lizzy, Deep Purple, Alice Cooper, Van Halen, Motorhead and more. He was Kerrang! magazine's star writer and the presenter of Monsters of Rock , his own weekly show on Sky TV, and the decade passed in a blur of hard drugs, hot women, and some of the heaviest people your mother definitely would not like. Depicting a world where vague concepts like 'the future' are disdained in favour of nights that last a week and weeks that last forever.

The last British Dambuster – one man’s extraordinary life and the raids that changed history by George JohnsonThe last British Dambuster – one man’s extraordinary life and the raids that changed history by George Johnson

92 year-old Johnny Johnson, the last British surviving Dambuster, relives every moment of the fatal night of 16th May 1943 when he and his squadron destroyed three dams deep within Germany's Ruhr Valley, and the devastating aftermath.

24 hours at Waterloo – 18 June 1815 by Robert J Kershaw24 hours at Waterloo – 18 June 1815 by Robert J Kershaw

'One of the lancers rode by, and stabbed me in the back with his lance. I then turned, and lay with my face upward, and a foot soldier stabbed me with his sword as he walked by. Immediately after, another, with his firelock and bayonet, gave me a terrible plunge, and while doing it with all his might, exclaimed, "Sacr? nom de Dieu !" ' The truly epic and brutal battle of Waterloo was a pivotal moment in history - a single day, one 24-hour period, defined the course of Europe's future. In March 1815, the Allies declared war on Napoleon in response to his escape from exile and the renewed threat to imperial European rule. Three months later, on 18 June 1815, having suffered considerable losses at Quatre-Bras, Wellington's army fell back on Waterloo, some ten miles south of Brussels. Halting on the ridge, they awaited Napoleon's army, blocking their entry to the capital. This would become the Allies' final stand, the infamous battle of Waterloo.

The angel and the cad – love, loss and scandal in Regency England by Geraldine RobertsThe angel and the cad – love, loss and scandal in Regency England by Geraldine Roberts

At the age of sixteen, Catherine Tylney Long became the wealthiest heiress in England, and the public found their 'angel'. Witty, wealthy and beautiful, Catherine was the most eligible of young ladies and was courted by royalty but, ignoring the warnings of her closest confidantes, she married for love. Her choice of husband was the charming but feckless dandy William Wellesley Pole, nephew of the Duke of Wellington. The pair excited the public's interest on an unprecedented scale with gossip columns reporting every detail of their magnificent home in Wanstead, where they hosted glittering royal fetes, dinners and parties. But their happiness was short-lived; just a decade later William had frittered away Catherine's inheritance and the couple were forced to flee into exile. As they travelled across Europe, they became embroiled in a series of scandals that shocked the public and culminated in a landmark court case.

1946 – the making of the modern world by Victor Sebestyen1946 – the making of the modern world by Victor Sebestyen

With the end of the Second World War, a new world was born. The peace agreements that brought the conflict to an end implemented decisions that not only shaped the second half of the twentieth century, but continue to affect our world today and impact on its future. In 1946 the Cold War began, the state of Israel was conceived, the independence of India was all but confirmed and Chinese Communists gained a decisive upper hand in their fight for power. It was a pivotal year in modern history in which countries were reborn and created, national and ideological boundaries were redrawn and people across the globe began to rebuild their lives.

London overground – a day’s walk around the ginger line by Iain SinclairLondon overground – a day’s walk around the ginger line by Iain Sinclair

Echoing his journey in London Orbital over a decade ago, Iain Sinclair narrates his second circular walk around the capital. Shortly after rush-hour and accompanied by a rambling companion, Sinclair begins walking along London's Overground network, or, 'Ginger Line'. With characteristic playfulness, detours into folk history, withering assessments of the political classes and a joyful allegiance to the ordinary oddball, Sinclair guides us on a tour of London's trendiest new transport network - and shows the shifting, changing city from new and surprising angles.

London with kids by Angela SutherlandLondon with kids by Angela Sutherland

'London with Kids' provides a comprehensive guide to the child-friendly highlights of London. There are detailed itineraries for excursions that last half a day, or a day, that pander to specific interests as well as providing entertainment for a range of ages. With detailed lists of kid-friendly attractions and places to eat, as well as insider tips on getting around, 'London with Kids' makes it possible for the whole family to experience and enjoy everything that this wonderful and vibrant city has to offer.

Dreamstreets – a journey through Britain’s village utopias by Jacqueline YallopDreamstreets – a journey through Britain’s village utopias by Jacqueline Yallop

Twenty years ago, Jacqueline Yallop began her working life leading guided walks at a small village high in the fells of the North Pennines. Built by philanthropic employers for families working the lead mines, the isolated settlement was one of a network of 'model' villages which sprang up across Britain during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In Dreamstreets, Yallop visits, and re-visits, some of these utopian experiments to explore their rich histories and to understand the social, political and cultural contexts from which they emerged. From Scotland's New Lanark mills to the imposing market square at Tremadog in Wales and the Arts and Crafts cottages of Port Sunlight, she walks the avenues and terraces to examine what remains of the impulses and ideals which made these villages so fashionable.

MAY

One life – my mother’s story by Kate Grenville

One Life is the story of Nance Russell, whose life spanned a century of tumult and change. In an act of great imaginative sympathy, her daughter Kate Grenville has drawn on the fragments of memoir Nance left, to create an intimate account of the patterns in her mother's life. In many ways Nance's story echoes that of many mothers and grandmothers, for whom the spectacular shifts of the twentieth century offered a path to new freedoms and choices. In other ways Nance was exceptional. In an era when women were expected to have no ambitions beyond the domestic, she ran successful businesses as a registered pharmacist, laid the bricks for the family home, and discovered her husband's secret life as a revolutionary. One Life is a deeply moving homage by one of Australia's finest writers.

Have you been good? – a memoir by Vanessa Nicolson

Vanessa Nicolson is the granddaughter of Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson. She was born to an illustrious name and an unhappy marriage. Her father, the art historian Ben Nicolson, was homosexual and his marriage to Vanessa's Italian mother fell apart when Vanessa was very young. In this powerful and meditative memoir she chronicles her disjointed childhood and reckless youth, including holidays at Sissinghurst Castle with her cousins, and her experience of a liberal English boarding school. Interlinked with her story is that of her daughter Rosa, who died, aged 19. This book is a meditation on the threads of love and loss that weave through a life and an examination of the meaning of cultural privilege in the context of emotional deprivation.

On the move – a life by Oliver W Sacks

When Oliver Sacks was twelve years old, a perceptive schoolmaster wrote in his report: 'Sacks will go far, if he does not go too far'. It is now abundantly clear that Sacks has never stopped going. From its opening pages on his youthful obsession with motorcycles and speed, On the Move is infused with his restless energy. As he recounts his experiences as a young neurologist in the early 1960s, first in California and then in New York, where he discovered a long-forgotten illness in the back wards of a chronic hospital, as well as with a group of patients who would define his life, it becomes clear that Sacks's earnest desire for engagement has occasioned unexpected encounters and travels - sending him through bars and alleys, over oceans, and across continents. With unbridled honesty and humour, Sacks shows us that the same energy that drives his physical passions - bodybuilding, weightlifting, and swimming - also drives his cerebral passions. He writes about his love affairs, both romantic and intellectual, his guilt over leaving his family to come to America, his bond with his schizophrenic brother, and the writers and scientists - Thom Gunn, A. R. Luria, W. H. Auden, Gerald M. Edelman, Francis Crick - who influenced him.

Secret sister by Cherry Durbin

The true story of a woman who uncovered the dramatic stories of her mother and sisters with the help of the award-winning television programme, Long Lost Family. Adopted at a young age, Cherry Durbin had spent over twenty years searching for traces of her natural mother and sister. She had given up until one day, watching the drama unfold on the television programme, Long Lost Family, her daughter suggested that maybe this was the only way she would ever find her sister. What she didn't expect to uncover was a story of a pregnant mother fleeing Nazi-invaded Jersey, a sister left behind to survive the deprivations of the German-controlled island and a family torn apart in a time when war left so many alone. Cherry's story, pieced together by a team of researchers, would bring her unimaginable sadness and joy, and answers where she had given up.

Marked for death by James Hamilton-Paterson

Little more than 10 years after the first powered flight, aircraft were pressed into service in World War I. Nearly forgotten in the war's massive overall death toll, some 50,000 aircrew would die in the combatant nations' fledgling air forces. The romance of aviation had a remarkable grip on the public imagination, propaganda focusing on gallant air 'aces' who become national heroes. The reality was horribly different. James Hamilton-Paterson reveals how four years of war produced profound changes both in the aircraft themselves and in military attitudes and strategy. By 1918 it was widely accepted that domination of the air above the battlefield was crucial to military success, a realization that would change the nature of warfare for ever.

The audacious crimes of Colonel Blood – the spy who stole the Crown Jewels and became the king’s secret agent by Robert Hutchinson

One morning in May 1671, a man disguised as a parson daringly attempted to seize the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. Astonishingly, he managed to escape with the regalia and crown before being apprehended. And yet he was not executed for treason. Instead, the king granted him a generous income and he became a familiar strutting figure in the royal court's glittering state apartments. This man was Colonel Thomas Blood, a notorious turncoat and fugitive from justice. Nicknamed the 'Father of all Treasons', he had been involved in an attempted coup d'’etat in Ireland as well as countless plots to assassinate Charles II. In an age when gossip and intrigue ruled the coffee houses, the restored Stuart king decided Blood was more useful to him alive than dead. But while serving as his personal spy, Blood was conspiring with his enemies. At the same time he hired himself out as a freelance agent for those seeking to further their political ambition.

Common people – the history of an English family by Alison Light

Beginning with her grandparents, Alison Light moves between the present and the past, in an extraordinary series of journeys over two centuries, across Britain and beyond. Epic in scope and deep in feeling, Common People is a family history but also a new kind of public history, following the lives of the migrants who travelled the country looking for work. Original and eloquent, it is a timely rethinking of who the English were - but ultimately it reflects on history itself, and on our constant need to know who went before us and what we owe them.

Channel shore – from the White Cliffs to Land’s End by Tom Fort

The English Channel is the busiest waterway in the world. Ferries steam back and forth, trains thunder through the tunnel. The narrow sea has been crucial to our development and prosperity. It helps define our notion of Englishness, as an island people, a nation of seafarers. It is also our nearest, dearest playground where people have sought sun, sin and bracing breezes. Tom Fort takes us on a fascinating, discursive journey from east to west, to find out what this stretch of water means to us and what is so special about the English seaside, that edge between land and seawater. He dips his toe into Sandgate's waters, takes the air in Hastings and Bexhill, chews whelks in Brighton, builds a sandcastle in Sandbanks, sunbathes in sunny Sidmouth, catches prawns off the slipway at Salcombe and hunts a shark off Looe. Stories of smugglers and shipwreck robbers, of beachcombers and samphire gatherers, gold diggers and fossil hunters abound.

Iceland by Brandon Presser

Lonely Planet Iceland is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Splash around in the Blue Lagoon's geothermal water, catch a glimpse of the celestial Northern Lights, or take a boat trip among the icebergs; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Iceland and begin your journey now!

Prague

The guide combines lively text with vivid photography to highlight the very best that this beautiful historic city has to offer. The Where to Go chapter details all the key sights: major art museums and galleries, the awe-inspiring Cathedral, the ornate synagogues of the Jewish Quarter and the spectacular Old Royal Palace. To inspire you, the book offers a rundown of the Top 10 Attractions in the city, followed by an itinerary for a Perfect Day in Prague. The What to Do chapter is a snapshot of ways to spend your spare time, from enjoying the city's rich musical heritage to sampling a glass of pilsner in one of its legendary beer cellars. You'll also be armed with background information, including a brief history of the city and an Eating Out chapter covering its hearty cuisine. There are carefully chosen listings Prague's best hotels and restaurants, and an A-Z to equip you with all the practical information you will need.

April

Kadian journal by Thomas Harding

In July 2012 Thomas Harding's fourteen-year-old son Kadian was killed in a bicycle accident. Shortly afterwards Thomas began to write. This book is the result. Beginning on the day of Kadian's death, and continuing to the one-year anniversary, and beyond, Kadian Journal is a record of grief in its rawest form, and of a mind in shock and questioning a strange new reality. Interspersed within the journal are fragments of memory: jewel-bright everyday moments that slowly combine to form a biography of a lost son, and a lost life. Kadian Journal is a document of startling bravery and candour - a description of a family dislocated and united by tragedy, and a beautiful and moving tribute to a son.

Romantic outlaws – the extraordinary lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon

English feminist Mary Wollstonecraft and author Mary Shelley were mother and daughter, yet these two extraordinary women never knew one another. Nevertheless, their passionate and pioneering lives remained closely intertwined, their choices, dreams and tragedies eerily similar. Both Marys became famous writers, fell in love with brilliant but impossible men, and were single mothers out of wedlock; both lived in exile, fought for their position in society and thought deeply about how we should live. They also broke every rigid convention thrust upon them. For the first time, Romantic Outlaws brings together a pair of visionary women who should have shared a life, but who instead share a powerful literary and feminist legacy. This is inventive, illuminating, involving biography at its best.

Lewis Carroll – a biography by Morton Norton Cohen

The definitive biography of Lewis Carroll reissued to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first publication of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Jerusalem – the real life of William Blake by Tobias Churton

Delving into the spiritual side of one the Romantic period's most renowned artists and poets, this biography explores for the first time the deeper meanings and enlightened thoughts that sit at the heart of Blake's trademark symbolism. It's hard to believe that Blake was largely unrecognized in his own time, today we can look back and see the influence that his visionary words and images had on our most recent culture history. Resonating most strongly during times of change we last saw a resurgence of Blake's influence during the 60s in the inspiring music of the Doors or Jimi Hendrix and the enlightening words of Aldous Huxley. Now as we once again face massive change in the world it's time to open our minds to the real William Blake, a revolutionary spiritual guru who can bring us right into the heart of our own true being.

Sir Curtly Ambrose – the autobiography by Curtly Ambrose

Sir Curtly Ambrose is one of the most famous cricket players of all time. He is also notorious for his silence. Now, for the first time, Curtly will tell his story. One of the leading - and most lethal - fast bowlers of all time, Curtly Ambrose played 98 Tests and 176 One Day Internationals for the West Indies, and for much of his career topped the ICC player rankings. He was an integral part of the iconic West Indies teams of the late 1980s and early 1990s whilst also bearing witness to their decline throughout the 1990s and beyond. A formidable sportsman, Curtly has unique insight into the extreme highs and debilitating lows of international cricket. But during his career Curtly Ambrose was notorious for his silence. He rarely spoke to the media and, if he did, it was usually to rebuff an interview, which earned him the infamous reputation of 'Curtly talks to no one!'

Magna Carta and us by David Starkey

2015 is the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, which took place in 1215. In this new book published in celebration of that event, eminent historian David Starkey explores the many aspects of Magna Carta and its relevance today.

How to ruin a queen – Marie Antoinette, the stolen diamonds and the scandal that shook the French throne by Jonathan Beckman

On 5 September 1785, a trial began in Paris that would divide the country, captivate Europe and send the French monarchy tumbling down the slope towards the Revolution. Cardinal Louis de Rohan, scion of one of the most ancient and distinguished families in France, stood accused of forging Marie Antoinette's signature to fraudulently obtain the most expensive piece of jewellery in Europe - a 2,400-carat necklace worth 1.6 million francs.

The noodle maker of Kalimpong – the untold story of the Dalai Lama and the secret struggle for Tibet by Anne F Thurston

The inside story of how the Dalai Lama struggled to hold on to Tibet, by his older brother, Gyalo Thondup. Thondup offers an intimate, personal look at the Dalai Lama and his immediate family, and the vicious and sometimes deadly struggles within the Potala Palace, the seat of power in Tibet.

KL – a history of the Nazi concentration camps by Nikolaus Wachsmann

A complete history of the Nazi concentration camp system combining the political and personal, examining the organisation of the genocidal machine, whilst drawing a vivid picture of life for the individual prisoner.

Globe – life in Shakespeare’s London by Catharine Arnold

The life of William Shakespeare, Britain's greatest dramatist, was inextricably linked with the history of London. Together, the great writer and the great city came of age and confronted triumph and tragedy. Triumph came when Shakespeare's company, the Chamberlain's Men, opened the Globe playhouse on Bankside in 1599, under the patronage of Queen Elizabeth I. Tragedy touched the lives of many of his contemporaries, from fellow playwright Christopher Marlowe to the disgraced Earl of Essex, while London struggled against the ever-present threat of riots, rebellions and outbreaks of plague. Globe takes its readers on a tour of London through Shakespeare's life and work, as, in fascinating detail, Catharine Arnold tells how acting came of age.

Great Britain by Neil Wilson

Lonely Planet Great Britain is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Ponder the mysteries of Stonehenge, explore the many sides of Edinburgh, or try new versions of British pub favourites at a gastropub; all with your trusted travel companion.

The rough guide to Yorkshire by Jos Simon

'The Rough Guide To Yorkshire' is a comprehensive guidebook to England's largest county. It includes comprehensive coverage of the county, from the ruggedly beautiful Dales and Moors and magnificent North Sea coast, historic York to the multi-cultural cities of Leeds and Sheffield.

Milan and the Lakes

Capture the essence of Milan and the Lakes with this guide. With listings on hotels and restaurants, and improved maps, it also provides practical information on where to go, what to take, how to get around, local specialities, main sight-seeing attractions and a complete area by area guide.

Trans-Siberian railway by Simon Richmond

Get to know your fellow passengers or just gaze through the window at the unfurling landscape, gawk at Moscow's Kremlin or glimpse Lake Baikal, Russia's sacred sea; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of the Trans-Siberian Railway and begin your journey now!

How to ruin a queen – Marie Antoinette, the stolen diamonds and the scandal that shook the French throne by Jonathan Beckman

On 5 September 1785, a trial began in Paris that would divide the country, captivate Europe and send the French monarchy tumbling down the slope towards the Revolution. Cardinal Louis de Rohan, scion of one of the most ancient and distinguished families in France, stood accused of forging Marie Antoinette's signature to fraudulently obtain the most expensive piece of jewellery in Europe - a 2,400-carat necklace worth 1.6 million francs.

Bali and Lombok by Ryan Ver Berkmoes

Lonely Planet Bali & Lombok is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Surf Lombok's spectacular waves, shop all day and party all night in glitzy Seminyak, or soak up the traditional culture in Ubud; all with your trusted travel companion.

Top 10 Dublin

Whether you are travelling first class or on a limited budget, this guide takes you straight to the very best of Ireland's capital. There are dozens of top ten lists - from venues for Irish music to unmissable museums and galleries, fun places for children, and the best restaurants, bars and hotels in Dublin.

Interesting – my autobiography by Steve Davis

Steve Davis was just a rookie from Plumstead, south London, learning how to play from an old book his snooker-obsessed father had given him, when an encounter with Barry Hearn changed his life forever. With his backing, Steve began touring the country in a clapped-out car as an amateur. Challenging established professionals and winning titles, supported by his loyal following the Romford Roar, it wasn't long before he progressed to the world's stage. Tens of millions of viewers would witness the nail-biting conclusions of his world championship finals. The man behind the 'boring' tag has always been the sport's smartest and sharpest man. With his cool, obsessive approach, Steve rewrote the rule book and became untouchably the best player in the world and the best paid sportsman in the country. Interesting lays it all bare: what it was like to win in those pressure-cooker situations; how to cope at the top, when everyone wants you to lose; and how you deal with the moment when a man comes along who is finally better than you.

Alfred Hitchcock by Peter Ackroyd

Alfred Hitchcock was a strange child. Fat, lonely, burning with fear and ambition, his childhood was an isolated one, scented with fish from his father's shop. Afraid to leave his bedroom, he would plan great voyages, using railway timetables to plot an exact imaginary route across Europe. So how did this fearful figure become the one of the most respected film directors of the twentieth century? As an adult, Hitch rigorously controlled the press's portrait of himself, drawing certain carefully selected childhood anecdotes into full focus and blurring all others out. In this quick-witted portrait, Ackroyd reveals something more: a lugubriously jolly man fond of practical jokes, who smashes a once-used tea cup every morning to remind himself of the frailty of life. Iconic film stars make cameo appearances, just as Hitch did in his own films. Grace Kelly, Carey Grant and James Stewart despair of his detached directing style, and, perhaps most famously of all, Tippi Hedren endures cuts and bruises from a real-life fearsome flock of birds.